Exquisite Fashion and more.

PREVIOUS PRODUCT NEXT PRODUCT
( 25 of 36 sort by pos. )

Old Style of 1932 Tirpitz Pocket Knife

More Views

Old Style of 1932 Tirpitz Pocket Knife
$590.00

Availability: In stock

Highlights

 

  • Old unique techniques and designs – founded on dusty pattern books from 1932 at a 175-year-old company in Solingen, Germany.
  • The tools were reproduced and innovation and experience were needed to manufacture using these old, relearned techniques.
  • Recycled steel of the barrels from historic German battleship Tirpitz supplies the 320-layer wild Damascus from one of the best German blacksmiths.

 

MADE IN GERMANY


image description image description

Details

 

  • The knife model is manufactured based off the drawings and sample books of 1932
  • The body of the knife (skeleton) is composed of two stamped brass liners, each having welded pins made of nickel silver, a back spring, a guard attached to the back spring, a connecting piece as well as a blade.
  • The part resulting from “liners” and “pins” is characterized as a “booklet”
  • The blade is made of 320-layer non-stainless Damascus using recycled steel from the German battleship Tirpitz – the wreck was salvaged by a Norwegian and German company.
  • A renown blacksmith folded the steel using traditional handcraft  
  • All of the parts are permanently riveted together – this pocket knife's production method is comparable to that of how the knife was assembled in 1932.
  • The knife's scales are made of mammoth tooth, a very fine and sensitive material, thinly sliced and difficult to handle during assembly.
  • The scales are carefully attached to the knife's skeleton
  • All of the approximately 100 different steps are real handcraft performed by highly skilled professionals
  • Information:
    • Total Length: 6 inches (152 mm) 
    • Blade Length: 2.5 inches (63 mm) 
    • Blade Strength: 0.08 inches (2 mm) 
    • Hardness: 61 – 63 HRC
    • Pattern: Wild Damascus

Disclaimer: None of our knives are produced with elephant ivory, but is derived from Mammoth. This is in accordance with recent United States legislation banning the commercial trade of elephant ivory. Further information can be found here.